Jazz Institute of Chicago

Welcome to the Jazz Institute of Chicago Journal, an archive of jazz writing. You'll find incredible articles about the history of Jazz in Chicago, as well as interviews with a variety of musicians and jazz related figures and reviews of recordings and live shows.

Clark Terry, Part 1

Clark Terry, Part 1
with Steve Voce

Live the Spirit at Hothouse: June 2002

Live the Spirit at Hothouse: June 2002
reviewed by Rahsaan Clark Morris

I had been hearing about Ernest Khabeer Dawkins’ Live The Spirit Band and, in fact, I had seen various combinations of the group at places like Fred Anderson’s Velvet Lounge and of course, Hothouse. But, earlier this summer there was a CD release set thrown by the Hothouse for the band’s last project—a recording of a live concert from late 2001, after 9-11.

Bird in Chicago

Bird in Chicago
by Joe Segal

I don't remember exactly when I met Charlie Parker for the first time. I'm sure it was in Chicago in 1946 or '47. He played Chicago frequently, sometimes with his quintet but more often as a single, usually at the Pershing Hotel Ballroom. In the hotel's basement, once called the E1 Grotto, Bird first shook up Chicago musicians as a tenor saxophonist with the 1943 Earl Hines Band.

Most Valued Player: Hampton Hawes

Most Valued Player: Hampton Hawes
by Nic Jones

Though the division between the east coast and west coast schools of jazz in the 1950s was rather more than the product of geography, it was simplistic. Put simply, consensus decreed that music emanating from New York was the work of hard-driving soloists accompanied by rhythm sections who knew only too well how to find and maintain a groove, while music coming out of Los Angeles was a less heated, more genteel affair.

David X. Young RIP

David X. Young RIP
by Bob Brookmeyer

[Painter and Loft Jazz impresario, David X. Young (1930-2001), died May 22 in New York City.]

We lost a gifted painter and a friend of jazz last night. For those of you under 50, you wouldn't likely have been present at the justly famed "Loft Sessions"—now in CD and booklet form.

Mel Tormé

Mel Tormé
By Steve Voce

This article first appeared in The Independent of London.

Mel Tormé was the most gifted and creative musician amongst all of the jazz singers, be they Ella Fitzgerald, Bing Crosby, Cleo Laine or Frank Sinatra. Apart from the impeccable lustre of his singing, he was an inspired composer, an outstanding drummer, an accomplished actor, a gifted author and a dedicated jazz fan who knew as much about the music as most of its historians. He began his jazz record collection when he was twelve.

Betty Carter

Betty Carter
by Stuart Nicholson

Sounds (Movin' on). I think I got it now. Caribbean sea. The trolley song. Everything I have is yours. I'll buy you a star. I could write a book. Can't we talk it over/Either it's love or it isn't. Deep night. Spring can really hang you up the most. Tight. Fake. So.... My favourite things. Open the door (theme song).

Former Beneke sax man Cecil Hill still “swings his thing ”

Former Beneke sax man Cecil Hill still “swings his thing ”
An interview with Bob Knack

Paul Desmond

Paul Desmond
by Stuart Nicholson
Paul Desmond Live
Horizon A&M SP-850, Verve 543 501-2 (+CD issue).

Desmond (alt); Ed Bickert (g); Don Thompson (bs); Jerry Fuller (d)
Toronto
25, 27, 30, 31 October and 1 November 1975.

Wendy. Wave. Things ain't what they used to be. Nancy. Manha de Carnival. Here's that rainy day. My funny Valentine. Take five.

Selections from the San Franciso Jazz Festival 2000

Selections from the San Franciso Jazz Festival 2000
reviewed by Rahsaan Clark Morris

Day 1
Wednesday, October 25