Jazz Institute of Chicago

Welcome to the Jazz Institute of Chicago Journal, an archive of jazz writing. You'll find incredible articles about the history of Jazz in Chicago, as well as interviews with a variety of musicians and jazz related figures and reviews of recordings and live shows.

Jeff Parker/Bernard Santacruz/Michael Zerang: Vega

Jeff Parker/Bernard Santacruz/Michael Zerang: Vega

Recorded live at Les 7 Lézards—a jazz club in Paris—“Vega” documents the first two performances by a trio comprised of Chicagoans Jeff Parker (g) and Michael Zerang (d), and French bassist Bernard Santacruz. This unlikely encounter can be credited to Alexandre Pierrepont—a French writer and ethnomusicologist who has been frequently visiting Chicago in the past few years.

Diane Delin: Origins

Diane Delin: Origins

Diane Delin plays the violin, has an original concept and composes fine tunes. Over the years many violinists have imitated the popular instruments and jazz styles of the moment. On this recording, Diane imitates no one and chooses to play her melodies and solos in a very musical and seemingly uncomplicated way. All of the tunes work together, ranging from swing to jazz waltz, modern bossa and more. There is a subtle fire here that grows with repeated listening.

Corky McClerkin: Island of Dreams

Corky McClerkin: Island of Dreams

Corky McClerkin is one of Chicago's great pianists capable of nearly anything in music. He is a tremendous asset to any sized band, any style, electric or acoustic and plays fine solo piano, too.

Jo Ann Daugherty Trio: Debut

Jo Ann Daugherty Trio: Debut

Pianist Jo Ann Daugherty, along with bassist Shawn Sommer and drummer Ryan Bennett left Kansas City a couple of years ago to play their music in Chicago. Although some club date successes have already passed us without any real public notice, this CD may help change their lives. Very simply, this is a great trio!

Joan Hickey: Soulmates, featuring Buster Williams

Joan Hickey: Soulmates, featuring Buster Williams

This is an interesting album from pianist Joan Hickey with two equally strong trios and trumpeter Jeff Helgesen rounding it out to a quartet on two tracks. Dennis Carroll and George Fludas on bass and drums respectively open the program. NYC bassist Buster Williams guests on five of the eleven tracks along with Joel Spencer on drums.

School Days: Crossing Division

School Days: Crossing Division

Taking its name from a famous record by the Steve Lacy/Roswell Rudd Quartet from the early sixties, School Days is one of reedist Ken Vandermark's latest projects. "Crossing Division" is remarkable on several counts.

The session features originals penned by Vandermark and long-time collaborator Jeb Bishop (tb) as well as two compositions by Roswell Rudd, including the truculent and swinging "Keep Your Heart Right". However, a great sense of unity and cohesion transpires. Moreover, the material is quite memorable.

BLUE: The Murder of Jazz

BLUE: The Murder of Jazz
by Eric Nisenson
St. Martin's Press, $22.95
262 pp.
Reviewed by Don Rose

To paraphrase my friend Garry Wills, I'm willing to believe a dozen bad things about Wynton Marsalis before breakfast, but this hysterical, sloppily written, badly argued, error-ridden, self-contradictory rant almost makes me want to join his defense team.

LIVING THE JAZZ LIFE: Conversations with Forty Musicians about Their Careers in Jazz

LIVING THE JAZZ LIFE:
Conversations with Forty Musicians
about Their Careers in Jazz
W. Royal Stokes
Oxford, 278 pages, $27.50
reviewed by Don Rose

Ever wonder how Slam Stewart began humming along with his bass-fiddle bowing?

The Future of Jazz

The Future of Jazz
By Will Friedwald, Ted Gioia, Jim Macnie, Peter Margasak, Stuart Nicholson, Ben Ratliff, John F. Szwed, Greg Tate, Peter Watrous, K. Leander Williams;
edited by Yuval Taylor
A Capella (Chicago Review Press), May 2002, 241 pages, $16.95
reviewed by Don Rose

Yuval Taylor, who did such a fine job at Da Capo Press with its program of reissuing jazz books, has come up with one very neat idea: get an interesting assortment of jazz critics and writers (some of whom are musicians) and have them interact on a series of issues relating to where this music may be going.

Jazz Joke Gallery, Part 1

Jazz Joke Gallery, Part 1
[Thanks to Bill O'Connell and Rich Corpolongo for forwarding these on to us—and yes, and there will be more where these came from.]

A young child says to his mother, "Mom, when I grow up I think I'd like to be a musician." She replies, "Well honey, you know you can't do both."

Q: What's the difference between a guitar player and a large pizza?
A: A large pizza can feed a family of four.

Q: What do you call a beautiful woman on a trombonist's arm?
A: A tattoo.

Q: What do you call a drummer in a three-piece suit?
A: "The Defendant."

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